NCLT rejects withdrawal application under S. 12-A IBC where corporate debtor entered into settlement only with a fraction of creditors: CIRP against Rolta India Ltd. will continue 

National Company Law Tribunal, NCLT Mumbai: Coram of Suchitra Kanuparthi, Judicial Member and Chandra Bhan Singh, Technical Member, observed that,

“…a Judicial authority ought not to pass Orders which would lead to further multiplicity of proceedings.”

The instant application was filed by the Operational Creditor who had earlier initiated the corporate insolvency resolution process against the Corporate Debtor−Rolta India Ltd. The applicant−Operation Creditor now sought withdrawal of his company petition admitted under Section 9 of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Code, 2016.

The applicant worked as an employee of the Corporate Debtor from March 2013 to June 2019, when he was relieved from services without settlement of arrears of salary and other dues. Consequently, he filed a petition under Section 9 which was admitted by the National Company Law Tribunal, Mumbai (“NCLT”), in May 2021 and an Insolvency Resolution Professional was appointed for the Corporate Debtor.

Thereafter, further negotiations took place between the parties and they reached a settlement agreement. Consequently, the application requested the Insolvency Resolution Professional to file an application under Section 12-A (Withdrawal of application admitted under Section 7, 9 or 10). As the Insolvency Resolution Professional did not file the application immediately, the applicant preferred the Section 12-A application before the NCLT.

The withdrawal application was vehemently opposed by the Financial Creditors (a consortium of several Public Sector Banks) and some of the other ex-employees. Notably, over 75 other petitions under Sections 7 and 9 of  IBC were pending against the Corporate Debtor.

Analysis, Law and Decision

Instant application had been filed under Section 12-A of the IBC read with Rule 11 of the NCLT Rules, 2016 by an employee of the Corporate Debtor company in the capacity of Operational Creditor seeking withdrawal of the company petition in terms of Regulation 30-A of the Insolvency and Bankruptcy Board of India (Insolvency Resolution Process for Corporate Persons) Regulations, 2016.

Applicant mentioned that he had approached the Insolvency Resolution Professional for filing the Application in Form FA under Regulation 30-A(1)(a) to seek withdrawal of the admitted company petition. However, he stated that the Insolvency Resolution Professional did not cooperate and, therefore, the applicant was compelled to file the present application on their own motion under Rule 11 of the NCLT Rules seeking withdrawal of the admitted company petition.

The Insolvency Resolution Professional mentioned that she had received claims/intimation of claims of about Rs 5523.81 crores from financial creditors, operational creditors and workmen employees of Rolta India Limited.

Further, the Bench noted that even under Workmen and Employees’ claim there were 567 employees whose claims had been collated by the Insolvency Resolution Professional. However, the settlement entered into by the Corporate Debtor was only with 32 employees. It was also noted that even the settlement which was proposed by the promoter on behalf of the Corporate Debtor company kept aside majority of the workmen employees’ claim which had been brought out by the Insolvency Resolution Professional. Moreover, the proposed settlement with the employees under the Joint Settlement Agreement will be done only after they withdraw the petition. The Bench observed:

“…Corporate Debtor is willing to pay the major part of the dues to the employees only subsequent to withdrawal of petition through the settlement jointly and/or severally with the employees. The Bench feels that this provides an escape route to both the promoter as well as to the Corporate Debtor Company to conveniently wriggle out of the partial mini settlement at any point of time.”

Major Issue 

The Tribunal noted the major issue:

Whether it would be proper for the Bench to allow withdrawal of corporate insolvency resolution process (“CIRP”) under Section 12-A or to exercise, its discretion to reject the present application under Section 12-A?

The Bench was fully aware that after passing the “Admission Order” dated 13-05-2021 and after the commencement of CIRP, the proceeding are in rem and therefore, any decision regarding the continuation or otherwise of CIRP has to be decided in the interest of all stakeholders and not just a handful of employees. It was reiterated:

“…under Section 53 of IBC the debts of the workmen rank equally with the financial debt owed to the secure/ unsecured creditors.”

In view of the above, it was stated that it cannot be ignored that Tribunal has to take into account the interest of all stakeholders. Before taking the discussion further, the Bench relied upon some of the prominent judgments in respect of the scope and ambit of Section 12-A of IBC. Supreme Court in the decision of Swiss Ribbons (P) Ltd. v. Union of India, (2019) 4 SCC 17, clearly directed that interest of all stakeholders have to be considered while accepting or disallowing an application for withdrawal.

Supreme Court recently in the matter of Indus Biotech (P) Ltd. v. Kotak India Venture (Offshore) Fund, 2021 SCC OnLine SC 268 has clearly observed that when a petition under Section 7 of IBC is admitted/triggered it becomes a proceeding in rem and even the creditor who has triggered the process would also lose control of the proceedings as corporate insolvency resolution process is required to be considered through the mechanism provided under IBC.

Further, the Tribunal noted that in the present matter, there were several Financial Creditors and total financial claim collated by the Insolvency Resolution Professional in the matter of Rolta India Ltd. was upward of Rs 5000 crore. Thus, this itself would be an enough ground to disallow the present application for withdrawal under Section 12-A. The Tribunal said:

“…even in the event of the original creditor [and] the Corporate Debtor settling their disputes prior to the constitution of the CoC, the Tribunal has sufficient jurisdiction to reject an application under Section 12-A of the IBC if the facts and circumstances of the case warrants such rejection.”

Tribunal in view of the above, expressed that, even if withdrawal was permitted, it is a fact that all the dues of all the employees of the Corporate Debtor company were not being settled. About more than 100 employees had lodged their claims against the Corporate Debtor. However, only some employees’ claims were being settled by the ex-management/promoter of the company. Therefore, the purported settlement lacked bona fide.

Moreover, the interest of the employees would be taken care of during the CIRP of the Corporate Debtor and they being operational creditors will be entitled to their rights as provided for under the IBC. Concluding, the Bench said that it had no doubt in its mind that considering that CIRP proceedings are in rem, the substantial claims of Financial Creditors cannot be disregarded or ignored in view of the purported settlement of certain employees of the Corporate Debtor.

In view of the above, the Bench dismissed the application filed under Section 12-A of the IBC and the CIRP against the Corporate Debtor company would continue. [Dinesh Gupta v. Rolta India Ltd., MA No. 1196 of 2021, decided on 6-08-2021]


Advocates before the Tribunal:

For the Promoter: Mr. Prateek Seksaria, Advocate.

For the IRP: Ms. Ranjana Roy Gawai, Mr. Pervinder, Mr. Vineet Kumar, Advocates a/w Ms. Vandana Garg, IRP.

For the Financial Creditor: Mr. Rohit Gupta, Mr. Nausher Kohli, Advocates.

For the Operational Creditor: Mr. Nausher Kohli and Mr. Rohit Gupta, Advocates

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