Case BriefsHigh Courts

Punjab and Haryana High Court: Hari Pal Verma, J. quashed the criminal proceeding as there was a compromise signed between the parties.

A petition was filed under Section 482 of the Code of Criminal Procedure, 1973 for quashing the FIR registered under Sections 406, 498-A of the Penal Code, 1860.

The records of the case are such that the parties appeared before the Judicial Magistrate 1st Class in which it was submitted that compromise was effected between the parties voluntarily without any coercion or undue influence. The complainant/respondent made a joint statement in which she had made the statement regarding the compromise between the two.

Gaganpreet Kaur, counsel for State had not disputed the fact of the compromise between the parties.

The Court thus opined that no useful purpose would be served to continue with the proceedings before the trial court. The Court reiterated the case of Gold Quest International (P) Ltd. v. State of T.N., 2014 (4) RCR (Criminal) 206, in which the Supreme Court held that “disputes which are substantially matrimonial in nature, or the civil property disputes with criminal facets, if the parties have entered into settlement, and it has become clear that there are no chances of conviction, there is no illegality in quashing the proceedings under Section 482 CrPC read with Article 226 of the Constitution.” Thus, all the proceeding was quashed qua the petitioner on the basis of the compromise entered between the parties.[Pankaj v. State of Haryana, 2019 SCC OnLine P&H 1112, decided on 04-07-2019]

Case BriefsHigh Courts

Punjab & Haryana High Court: Appellant had prayed before the Bench of Surinder Gupta, J., that the Will made by mother of both the parties was illegal, null and void being obtained by the respondent under undue influence, coercion, misrepresentation and that she was incompetent to make Will of conjoint property.

The Trial Court had upheld the Will executed by the mother and suit of the appellant was dismissed. It was submitted that both the parties had equally contributed to purchase the land though it was purchased on their mother’s name who could not have purchased the land being a household lady. Thus, Will executed by her was illegal being obtained under undue influence, coercion, misrepresentation. Trial Court found the Will to be validly executed and thus under Section 14 of Hindu Succession Act, 1956 the mother was the absolute owner of the suit property and was competent to execute the Will. Statement of account was brought before Court as proof that the appellant had contributed to the sale of the property.

High Court was of the view that even if the financial contribution was done for sale the transaction cannot be said to be Benami transaction. Therefore, the appeal was dismissed and Courts below have not committed any error in stating that Will was valid, registered and rightly executed. [Dharam Singh v. Anil Kumar, 2019 SCC OnLine P&H 428, decided on 23-04-2019]

Case BriefsHigh Courts

Bombay High Court at Goa: A Single Judge Bench comprising of C.V. Bhadang, J., dismissed an appeal filed against the concurrent findings of the courts below that resulted in decreeing the suit of the respondents.

The matter related to the validity of the Will in question. The respondents had filed a regular civil suit against the appellant, contending that the said Will was obtained by undue influence exercised by the appellants over the testator. The trial court framed as many as eight issues. And after appreciation of evidence, decreed the suit of the respondents. Appellant preferred an appeal before the district judge. However, the same got dismissed. Aggrieved thus, the appellant approached the High Court. It was submitted that the Appellate Court did not frame proper points which violated Order 41 Rule 31 CPC.

The High Court, on a careful consideration of rival submissions made on behalf of the parties, was of the view that appeal did not raise any substantial question of law. The Court observed that when an appeal is heard on merits, the High Court has to examine whether the failure of the first Appellate Court to formulate the questions as required by Order 41 Rule 31 has resulted in miscarriage of justice. The Court was of the opinion that the points framed by the Appellate Court showed that all the necessary issues were covered. Further, the Court observed that Section 99 of CPC inter alia provides that no decree shall be reversed or substantially varied, nor shall any case be remanded in appeal on account of any error not affecting the merits of the case or the jurisdiction of the court. The Court held that in the instant case there was no such miscarriage of justice that affected the merits of the case. The Court did not find it a fit case to interfere with the impugned judgment. Therefore, the appeal was dismissed. [Shablo Govind Gaude v. Kashinath Govind Gaude,2018 SCC OnLine Bom 1239, dated 14-6-2018]