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This commentary on Juvenile Justice by Kumar Askand Pandey is an attempt at analysing and understanding the law, philosophy and policies on child rights and child protection as embodied in the JJ Act, 2015. Written in the style of a section-wise commentary, the book provides to its readers an exhaustive insight into the legislative framework of the JJ Act, 2015 as supplemented and complemented by the JJ Rules, 2016.

The book contains a historical introduction to child rights in India, tracing its origin and taking us to the present times, along with 10 chapters, arranged in the same sequence and with the same title as they appear in the JJ Act, 2015. Further, Adoption Regulations, 2017 issued by Central Adoption Resource Authority have been discussed.

The book exhaustively covers the cases of the Supreme Court and the High Court in the area of Juvenile Justice.

Also  included  are  additional  learning  resources  on www.ebcexplorer.com:

  • Access to important case law as indicated by Case PilotTM .
  • Discussion ForumTM to post comments, discuss and explore ideas.
  • SCC Online® Blog to stay updated on recent happenings of the legal world.
  • Useful LinksTM get access to a compilation of learning resources.

The book will be of immense use for students of LL.B. and LL.M. Further, the book is a must for law enforcement agencies, police officers,  law teachers, researchers, scholars and practicing lawyers.


Brief Contents

I. Preliminary

II. General Principles of Care and Protection of Children

III. Juvenile Justice Board

IV. Procedure in Relation to Children in Conflict with Law

V. Child Welfare Committee

VI. Procedure in Relation to Children in Need of  Care and Protection

VII. Rehabilitation and Social Reintegration

VIII. Adoption

IX. Other Offences Against Children

X. Miscellaneous

Appendix — Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Amendment Bill, 2018


*Buy Your Copy here: Juvenile Justice- A Commentary

Case BriefsHigh Courts

Kerala High Court: The Division Bench of K.Harilal and Annie John. JJ. allowed a revision petition filed by mother of a 15-year old girl, who was subjected to sexual assault by a family friend named Imam Mr Shafeek Al-Kasmi.

The instant petition under Section 102 of the Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015 challenging the order of respondent whereby it was declared that petitioner’s minor daughter required care and protection and that the child’s counselling shall be carried out by admitting her in an institution. 

Mr Ram Mohan G., counsel on behalf of the petitioner, submitted that the continued detention of a child under the orders of respondent was prejudicial to her interests and well being as she required the moral support, guidance and presence of her mother.

Mr Suman Chakravarthy, Senior Government Pleader appearing on behalf of respondent, submitted that even though the sexual assault took place in February 2019, petitioner and her relatives did not report the matter to police due to which the child could not be medically examined. Further, as per the report of District Child Protection Officer, it was not congenial to restore the child to the petitioner, since the accused was a well-known religious leader and a frequent visitor of their family, who had not been arrested so far. Therefore, the child was not safe with the petitioner.

The learned Judges interacted with the child in Chambers in the absence of her mother and relatives. The child expressed her willingness to go along with her mother or maternal grandmother but was not ready to live in the institution. 

The Court opined that inquiry, as contemplated under Section 36 of the Act, was not conducted by the respondent in the presence of petitioner or other family members of the victim. Respondent did not try to ascertain the wishes of the child. Thus, the mandate of Section 3 of the Act was violated. It was held that when the child needs care and protection, then before putting the child in Children’s Home, there should be the application of mind by the committee and it must also take into account the child’s wishes along with the investigation report of Child Welfare Committee.

In view of the above, the impugned order was set aside and Superintendent of Child Shelter Home was directed to release the child forthwith to the petitioner-mother.[Sheeja Navas v. Child Welfare Committee, 2019 SCC OnLine Ker 1156, Order dated 08-03-2019]

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As per Ministry of Labour & Employment, Government is following a multi-pronged strategy for elimination of child labour. It comprises of statutory and legislative measures, rehabilitation and universal elementary education along with convergence with other schemes for socio economic development. Government has enacted the Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Amendment Act, 2016 which came into force w.e.f. 01-09-2016. The Amendment Act inter alia provides for complete prohibition of work or employment of children below 14 years in any occupation and process and adolescents in the age group of 14 to 18 years in hazardous occupations and processes. The amendment also provides stricter punishment for employers for violation of the Act and made the offence as cognizable.

After strengthening the legislative framework through amendment in Child Labour Act, Government has framed the Child Labour (Prohibition & Regulation) Amendment Rules, 2017 which inter alia specifies the duties and responsibilities of State Governments and District Authorities to ensure effective enforcement of the provisions of the Act. Government has also devised a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) as a ready reckoner for trainers, practitioners and enforcing and monitoring agencies. Government is also implementing the National Child Labour Project (NCLP) Scheme for rehabilitation of child labour. Under the Scheme children in the age group of 9-14 years, rescued/withdrawn from work are enrolled in the NCLP Special Training Centres, where they are provided with bridge education, vocational training, mid day meal, stipend, health care, etc. before being mainstreamed into formal education system.  Further to ensure effective enforcement of the provisions of the Child Labour Act and smooth implementation of the NCLP Scheme a separate online portal PENCIL (Platform for Effective Enforcement for No Child Labour) has been developed.

In addition to above Ministry of Women and Child Development has enacted Juvenile Justice (Care and Protection of Children) Act, 2015 (JJ Act). As per Section 2 (14) (ii) and (ix) of JJ Act, a child who is found working in contravention of labour laws for the time being in force or is found begging, or living on the street and who is found vulnerable and is likely to be inducted into drug abuse or trafficking is included as a “child in need of care and protection”, among others. The children in need of care and protection (CNCP) for rehabilitation has been placed in institutional care i.e. children homes or non-institutional care, such as sponsorship, foster care by Child Welfare Committee. As per JJ Act, 2015, State/UTs are required to set-up Child Care Institutions (CCIs) and are also required to register and monitor them under Section 41 and 54 of the Act respectively.  The primary responsibility of execution of the Act, lies with the State/UTs. However, Central Government is managing “Child Protection Services” (CPS) (erstwhile Integrated Child Protection Scheme) under umbrella Integrated Child Development Services, and providing financial assistance, as Grant-in-Aid, to the States/UTs on sharing pattern for, inter-alia, undertaking a situational analysis of children in difficult circumstances, for setting up and maintenance of various types of CCIs. Further National Commission for Protection of Child Rights (NCPCR), a statutory organization under this ministry, has developed a Standard Operating Procedure (SOP) for care and protection of Children in Street Situations to streamline the processes and interventions regarding children in street situations. Under the scheme “CPS”, institutional care is provided through CCIs, as a rehabilitative measure. In these CCIs, children are provided age appropriate education either within the institution or outside in a formal education system through convergence with other schemes and programs of the Government or civil society. Under the non-institutional care component, support is extended for adoption, foster care and sponsorship.

Ministry of Women and Child Development