Law School NewsLSAT IndiaMoot Court Announcements

Law schools organize Moot Competitions to train law students in reasoning, argument, and legal analysis. These competitions teach students to explore both sides of an argument, learn to present their conclusions coherently and improve their written and oral communication.

LSAC Global is providing this opportunity to law aspirants through the 2nd Moot Court Competition for Law Aspirants on 5th and 6th February 2022. This competition aims to provide a challenging and yet fun experience of the courtroom to law aspirants to help them develop their analytical, critical reasoning and advocacy skills without the need to have legal knowledge or any legal training. An interactive event that will provide an opportunity for participants to learn about the legal system and what it is like to be a lawyer.

The participants will be analyzing the factual matrix of the situation provided and arguing on the same.

 

Eligibility

The competition is open to all school students currently in grade 11, 12 or who are yet to be enrolled into a law school.

 

Objectives

LSAC Global is conducting this competition with the objective of improving communication skills, critical thinking skills and problem-solving abilities of law aspirants. This will help in exposing high school students to the nuances of court system in India and provide real-life experience and training in presenting relevant oral and written arguments.

Registrations

Interested students can register for the event till 25th January 2022. All participants will be required to submit a Memorial on 31st January 2022 after due training is provided to them. Preliminary rounds will be conducted on 5th February 2022 for the shortlisted students and the winners of each preliminary round will qualify for the final round on 6th  February 2022. There is no registration fee for participating in this competition.

Prize

All participants who will register, successfully submit the memorials on the due date and appear for the oral rounds on the event date will be awarded a Certificate of Participation

The winners in the rounds will receive a Certificate of Merit and a medal under each of the following categories:

  • Winner
  • Runners-up
  • Best Written Argument and Memorial
  • Best Speaker

Important Dates

Registration for Moot Competition 7th October – 25th  January 2022
Mentoring/ Training Session 27th January – 29th January 2022
Memorial Submission 31st January 2022
Allotment of Sides 02nd February 2022
Preliminary Round 05th February 2022
Final Round 06th February 2022

 

Important Links

Moot Problem

2nd LSAC-DLI-Moot-Court-Brochure

Contact Details

For more details, please visit our website.

To register for the 2nd DLI Moot Court competition click Here.

In case you have any queries, write to discoverlawindia@lsac.org.

Interviews

IDIA UP Chapter scholars, Sumyya and Anmol Raj, qualified the Common Law Admission Test, 2021. Sumyya, who secured All India Rank 1215, will be joining RML National Law University, Lucknow. Anmol bagged All India Rank 91 (PWD), and will attend National Law University, Odisha.

They are interviewed by EBC-SCC Ambassador Vanaj Vidyan, who is a fourth-year student at RML National Law University.

Congratulations on successfully qualifying CLAT 2021.

 

  1. Before we get to the formal questions, let us begin by asking how you feel about the results? Were you expecting this phenomenal performance?

 

Sumyya:  It is absolutely surreal. I was never certain that I would actually score enough to get into a top NLU. There were always lingering doubts that sometimes would be so strong that it would make me want to give up. But because of my mother I kept pushing through. I kept working everyday to the best of my abilities and it makes me so happy to see them bear fruit.

 

Anmol: Not at all. It is a very nice but strange feeling because it is like something you were too scared to imagine, actually taking place. I will never forget the day when I got to know about my results. It is a very special day for me.

  1. Please introduce yourself to our readers. Was deciding to study law a conscious choice? What motivated you for that?

 

Sumyya: Hello everyone. I am Sumyya. I hail from Amroha, Uttar Pradesh. I love reading and writing diaries and letters. Moreover, I am also into coding and web designing. Studying law was not the first option I had in my mind. I have an active interest in politics and when I was young, I wanted to be the Prime Minister of India. As a teenager, I wanted to change the world by pursuing a bachelor’s degree in History from St. Stephens College and thereafter cracking civil services. But entry into St. Stephens and civil services both are not that easy, and one also cannot be so sure about it. It was only after opting for humanities in 12th that I realised I want to work at the grassroot level. So I need to be equipped with the right knowledge to be able to work for the betterment of society. That is when I thought of pursuing law and started searching all about the 5-year law degree.

 

Anmol: Hi, I am Anmol Raj from Sonbhadra, Uttar Pradesh. I live with my parents and my elder brother. I am visually impaired. I love to play online chess and I also have an interest in technology. Inspiration for choosing law came from various sources. One of my father’s friends, who is a lawyer, was the first source of inspiration. When I moved to Lucknow to continue my studies after a long gap of 5 years, one of my teacher’s family members was also in the legal field. She informed me about the possibilities of succeeding in this field despite being visually impaired. I thought about it and decided that I want to help those who fail to afford legal aid due to financial inability.

 

  1. Tell us a little about your educational background. Where did you complete your Class XII? Any memories you would like to share associated with your school life?

 

Sumyya: I did my schooling from Aligarh Muslim University Board and secured 93% in humanities in 12th standard. I stayed in the hostel there. Initially, I did not want to open up to people because I was too apprehensive of sharing my life experiences and struggles as I am a single child of a single mother. I am just 17 but I have gone through a lot. I was shy and reticent, but after being in the hostel, I learnt a lot from everyone. I realised that everybody suffers in one way or another. And now, I am a completely different person because of the people I met throughout the years.

 

Anmol: I have had blurred vision in my left eye since birth due to a defect. I completely lost my vision in both eyes just 2 months before the 10th board exams. Thereafter, I lost 5 years of my academic life in treatment. When I resumed my schooling in 2017, I had to start from Class 9th so again I was dragged back by 2 years. But when I started, I was motivated and I worked hard to make up for all the lost time. I was academically inclined and used to participate in debates, and all other activities within my reach. Once, I went for a rehabilitation course of three-and-a-half months in Mumbai; there I was trained in mobility, and computers as well. I was awarded 1st prize for scoring highest in academics, computers, and games (mental and physical). That was a defining moment for me after that long frustrating gap of 5 years during which I felt I was losing my skill sets. I felt great and since then I have not looked back and always tried to give my best in everything.

  1. Not everyone is privileged when it comes to higher education financially or otherwise. Family support usually plays a crucial role. Would you like to share something about how your family supported your preparations? How was their reaction on coming to know of your success?

 

Sumyya: My mother is an Anganwadi worker. She is my only family. She is everything to me. What she has done for me and is still doing, it is impossible for me to express. She stood beside me at every point of my life as the biggest support system. I was not so sure about cracking CLAT but she motivated me and made me believe in myself. I used to study at night, so she used to wake up to check upon me and to see if I needed something. When I had started my preparation, I was skipping mocks and had got a lot piled up in the last 3 months. I completed all the mocks because my mother made me conquer my fear of mocks and also made me accountable for them. And that I believe it made the difference. Along with my mother, my paternal uncle (chacha) was also there for me, emotionally and financially. He took out time from his busy schedule to help me study and motivate me. I will forever be grateful for that.

When I told them about my success, they were all happy and proud of me.

 

Anmol: My parents and my elder brother have always been supportive of me. After my vision loss, they took great care of me and motivated me a lot. It was only because of their strength and encouragement that I could resume my education.

When I told them about my results, they were very delighted and proud.

  1. Could you share something about your CLAT preparations? How did you get to know about IDIA?

 

Sumyya: This question reminds me of a quote from To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee, “Until I feared I would lose it, I never loved to read. One does not love breathing.”

Likewise, until I stopped preparing for CLAT, I never loved it.

I started my CLAT preparations in 2021. Like every other student, I started with an aim to be at NLS but I am grateful for RMLNLU as well.

This year was no different from last year, with covid deaths, lockdowns, online classes, uncertainty over board exams, and much more. Some days I used to be highly motivated, and other days, my pessimistic self had adverse effects on my preparation. But I was fortunate enough to have my mother and IDIA by my side. My IDIA mentors helped me out a lot, from concept-related doubts to analysing my strategy, my mocks, and  pushing me to do more. Watching videos of the past year toppers helped me get through it too. It was only then I came across a video of one last year’s rank holder, therein I came across IDIA. After researching about it, I tried to contact through Instagram; within a few days IDIA UP Chapter contacted me.

 

Anmol: Initially, when I had decided that I wanted to pursue law, I did not know about CLAT and NLUs. It was only in September 2020 when a friend of mine provided me with a link saying that since you want to pursue law this webinar may help you. I joined it and it was IDIA’s sensitisation session. I got to know everything I needed to know about CLAT and other law entrance examinations, NLUs, and the diverse career options as well. I contacted the IDIA UP Chapter immediately through the contact info provided during the session. And I did not look back ever since. The study material provided and the regular interaction with my mentors really helped me. Not only it was useful in maintaining regularity in my schedule but was helpful in releasing the exam-related stress.

  1. What was the IDIA selection process? Once you got selected, how did IDIA help you?

Sumyya: I wrote INAT i.e. IDIA National Aptitude Test. After passing INAT, the background check was done. Then I was inducted as a trainee in the Chapter in December and started my CLAT preparation. Mentors from the IDIA team were allotted and study material was also provided. With the help of my mentors, I started going through the study material. I was so motivated and excited in the beginning that I completed the study material for English in just 2 days. I was enrolled in a coaching but since I had started late, I had a lot of pending classes. I started with the very first class but that made me to skip mocks. That was the biggest blunder I made. But thankfully with my mentors’ help I realised my mistake and I got back on the right track within a month. I was not so confident with current affairs but the weekly quizzes organised by IDIA team helped me prepare well. Logical reasoning classes conducted by IDIA volunteers were a definite plus.

 

Anmol: I wrote INAT and after the background check process was done, I was inducted as a trainee in the Chapter. IDIA guided me at every step of my preparation. The mentors made me familiar with the entrance exam pattern. Since I had to prepare for my 12th boards as well, my mentors planned my studies for me and I started with the IDIA’s study material which really helped me solidify the basics in each section. I depend on the screen reader for reading and the soft copy of the study material made it accessible for me which otherwise would not have been possible. I was enrolled in a coaching and tests started from January. I attempted the test, got to know about my mistakes and worked on them with the help of my mentors. The one-on-one sessions with the mentors, the logical reasoning classes, and the weekly current affairs quizzes helped me a lot and this direct interaction proved to be fruitful.

Being visually impaired, I needed a scribe to accompany me in the exam but I was not able to find one. It was only in one of the logical reasoning classes of IDIA that I met my scribe. In fact, he himself came forward to help me. He has really worked hard for me and I am extremely grateful to him for that.

  1. CLAT is often accused of being an examination for the elite, for excluding financially weak students with Rs 4000 fee, and excluding State board students with its English-exclusive nature. Do you concur with this statement? Do you think you would have prepared for CLAT if not for IDIA? And if yes, how would your circumstances be different?

 

Sumyya:  I wholeheartedly agree with this. I feel CLAT is getting further and further away from the general population of India and as you mentioned, becoming a poster child of the elite. I know many people who had to work extra hard for this test just because they did not have the privilege to be taught in english medium schools. I think it is very wrong to have made the language of the privileged few as the means to success in this exam. But IDIA has truly helped me a lot to overcome this barrier. The mentors and other seniors guiding us, despite being busy, would never shy away from lending an extra hand and solving our doubts. They would keep sending us important worksheets and PDFs to help strengthen our command of this language. Had it not been for them it would have been very difficult for us. Preparing for CLAT without IDIA’s help was out of the question for me. It would not have been possible at all to even think of sitting for the exam without their financial and academic help.

 

Anmol: Yes, I believe that the current CLAT pattern gives unfair advantage to a certain sect of students. I have heard of debates regarding English being the all means all of CLAT.Of course, I feel it is wrong. It gets restricted to a very small pool of people and prevents diversity in these premiere institutes which is quite detrimental. I hope the consortium works towards this. And for the exclusivity of students from financially weak backgrounds is concerned, I remember losing all hope when I learnt about how much it costs to take the test and the fee structure of the NLUs. We could not afford it. I was ready to compromise my dream. And then I got to know about IDIA which changed everything for me. Finally, it felt like there was some hope and maybe I could actually do what I have always wanted to do after all. So yes, IDIA has played a huge role in this. I would not be here if it were not for them.

  1. Did the online nature of the past year affect your CLAT preparations? What were some other hardships you faced? What motivated you to keep going through them?

Sumyya: Yes, it did affect my preparation a bit. I think the biggest drawback of online preparation is that the sense of competitiveness is missing in online classes. I am a really competitive person. Seeing others doing well, I get motivated to do better. Interaction among the co-aspirants and with the teacher also becomes tricky in the online mode. The IDIA mock score list helped me here to an extent. I used to compare the topper’s scores with mine and analyse what it is that I am lacking. My IDIA mentors were there to solve my doubts anytime and the weekly quizzes used to be interactive as well. So, there were some drawbacks and hardships but there were benefits too. Since I had started late, the online mode allowed me to catch up on all the classes I had missed which could not have been possible had it been the offline mode.

A lot was going on in the country throughout the year so, there were some days of motivation and some days of distress as well. But I kept in mind the sacrifices my mother has made and her faith in me kept me going. Her hard work made me work harder.

 

Anmol: Yes, the online nature of the preparation did affect me a bit. I used to have major network issues because I was at home in a rural area. I had to plan my day as per the network availability. But it was manageable. I had the benefit of watching the class videos multiple times which helped me in revising. It is true that the sense of competition is lacking in the online mode but I believe online mode has more benefits for me than disadvantages.

I have had some moments when I wished to give up, especially on not scoring good in mocks. But I always tried to focus my mind on why did I start, why do I want to do this, what do I want to achieve, what would be that happiness when I succeed? All these thoughts kept me motivated since I did not want my dream to remain a dream only.

  1. You will now garner five years of knowledge at a national law university. Do you plan to apply it for giving back to society?

 

Sumyya: Yes, definitely. In fact, this was my motivation to opt for law in the first place. I do not want to work in the corporate sector. I wish to go for judiciary or litigation so that I am able to fulfil my aspirations of working for the society.

 

Anmol: Yes, I want to use the knowledge I will acquire to help people like me, like IDIA does. I wish to become a criminal lawyer. That is what I have in mind for now, it may change after 5 years, but one thing is certain that I will work to the best of my capacity for the downtrodden people.

  1. There are millions of talented students who fail to access quality higher education in India. Your performance in CLAT serves as an example to all such students. What would be a message you would send to an underprivileged student, who harnesses the same dream as you?

Sumyya: The only message I have for all such students is: believe in yourself. It is true that people prepare for 2-3 years to get into a law school but if you work hard consistently without committing many mistakes, you can do it with a few months of preparation as well. Things may not go the way you have planned, but do not panic, just believe in yourself.

 

Anmol: My online advice would be: work hard to improve your weak areas, do not waste your precious time. If I can do it, anyone can.


The interviewer thanks IDIA UP Chapter for facilitating this interview.

IDIA needs your help to sponsor the education of these students. They have shown their mettle and money should not stand in their way of pursuing their education. If you want to contribute towards their education, please write to info@idialaw.org.

Read more about IDIA here: https://www.idialaw.org/

Get in touch with IDIA here: info@idialaw.org

Get in touch with IDIA UP Chapter here: rmlnluteam@idialaw.org

Law School NewsOthers

Amid the unprecedented situation across the country, CLAT-2021 was conducted in pen and paper mode successfully and without the news of any mishaps or violation of safety norms. Health and safety of all stakeholders of CLAT-2021 remained of a central importance for the Consortium. The team of Convenor, Prof. (Dr.) Vijender Kumar, Vice-Chancellor of MNLU Nagpur published the result within five days from the day of Test with a support of the Secretary of CNLUs Prof. (Dr.) Sudhir Krishnaswamy at the Consortium headquarters and the guidance of Executive Committee of CNLUs.

CLAT-2021 was conducted on July 23, 2021 at 147 centres in 82 cities across the country. Out of 70,277 candidates who registered, 66,887 downloaded their Admit Cards and 62,106 appeared for the Test. 147 Centres were coordinated through 24 Regional Centres, supervised by 174 Centre Superintendents, 184 Centre Observers and more than 3,500 Invigilators. All stakeholders conducting CLAT-2021 were provided with COVID Kits containing sanitizer, mask, face shield, and hand-gloves. Apart from increasing Test Centres from previous years, the Consortium had directed the Centres to accommodate less than 50% of actual seating capacity in the examination halls. The Consortium organised CLAT-2021 to ensure the health and safety of all stakeholders of CLAT-2021. The Test Centres were directed to display Seating Plans at multiple visible locations to avoid crowding and were also advised to display Flex Printed Seating Plans wherever required.


CLICK HERE FOR THE RESULTS


 

IDIA

Jai Singh is a focused and conscientious student from Bihar. His dream has always been to be a change-maker for his community and society. During his search for a career choice that would suit his passion, he came across the law. However, he wasn’t sure if it was the right choice as his community considered law as a career option for “dull and weak students”.

To add to his woes, he found out that the cost of a law school education far exceeded his family’s only source of income (Rs.1,50,000 annually) from a small grocery store (Kirana Dukhan) in his hometown. He never gave up and searched for scholarship opportunities to pursue his dream career. His search ultimately narrowed down on IDIA.

After verifying his credentials and understanding his passion for law, the Bihar Chapter of IDIA took him under its wings. He was offered online training classes, mock tests, mentoring, and doubt clearance sessions. Often the classes went on till late night.

Jai’s consistent hardwork and perseverance gave him an outstanding result in CLAT 2020. He stood out as the 3rd best candidate in CLAT 2020 (AIR 3) and secured a seat at NLSIU, Bangalore.

He is excited to pursue his passion and is committed to give back to society through his legal education.


About IDIA:

 IDIA is a pan-India movement to train underprivileged students and help transform them into leading lawyers and community advocates. IDIA is premised on the notion that access to premier legal education empowers marginalized communities and helps them help themselves. IDIA selects and trains students from underprivileged backgrounds (IDIA Trainees) to crack top law entrance examinations in India. Once they are admitted to top law colleges, it provides a scholarship to these students (IDIA Scholars) that comprises financial support, training and mentorship among other things.

Read more about IDIA here: https://www.idialaw.org/

Get in touch with them here: info@idialaw.org


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IDIA

Call for applications to be part of the Training & Materials Vertical of the Increasing Diversity by Increasing Access (IDIA) Project, in the capacity of Members of the Vertical.

The IDIA Project was initiated by Prof. (Dr.) Shamnad Basheer to reach out to the marginalized and under-represented groups, sensitize them to law as a viable career option and help interested students acquire admission in law schools, which are otherwise increasingly elitist spaces. The hope is that increasing access to legal education would contribute immensely to empowerment of the marginalized and underprivileged students and the communities they represent. To know more about the project, visit www.idialaw.org

The Training and Materials Vertical (T&M Team) of IDIA is responsible for preparation of training-material for our trainees to practice with. The Team is inviting applications in the capacity of Members. The work will include preparing:

  1. Learning Material 

To adapt to the new CLAT pattern that is heavily analytical and comprehension based, we aim to create extensive material that our trainees can utilise to learn concepts and read faster. This will include creating short explanations in very simple language on the various legal, mathematical, english, logical and static general knowledge questions that frequent the new pattern. The subject matter will be as per the requirements of the trainees. The explanations can be in the nature of documents, video training, voice notes, or games.

Thus, this project shall enable you to implement unique learning methods in your material to help make the process both fun and informative. Moreover, the new pattern will require original thinking to create comprehension-based questions of 400-500 words per question. If you have a sound grasp of subject areas tested through law entrance examinations, and wish to disseminate this knowledge country-wide then please do apply!

  1. Mock Tests

We will be required to create mock tests in accordance with the new examination pattern. The work would entail:

  • Creating mock tests calibrated to different difficulty levels.
  • Proof-reading questions and answer keys in pre-existing Mock Tests.
  • Administering tests and analysing test results so as to give detailed, individualised feedback to test-takers.

Over the years, our trainees have greatly benefited from regular feedback on their performance. In addition to designing questions, you will have an opportunity to extensively engage with our new platform, code tests, and conduct data analysis using MS Excel. Once again, prior knowledge of these tools is NOT a prerequisite.

Position:

Members: Members will be taken for each of the subjects forming part of the CLAT/AILET pattern namely English, Maths, Logical Reasoning, Legal Reasoning and General Knowledge.

While you have the option of applying for more than one subject, it should be made clear that you will ultimately be selected only for one position.

Qualifications required:

The minimum qualifications for this post are the following:

  1. The T&M Vertical must be first priority for you. You should be able to spare at least 5-6 hours a week for this work.
  2. It is essential that you believe in and be committed to IDIA’s cause.
  3. Good communication skills along with leadership qualities are also a must.

Incentives:

The biggest incentive in working as part of IDIA is, of course, the satisfaction of having made a great contribution towards a great cause. However, if the promise of a social revolution and transforming someone’s life is not good enough for you, some material incentives which you could consider are:

  1. IDIA’s various supporters and donors (including some of the leading law firms) have agreed to grant internship opportunities to best performing IDIA volunteers. In the past, IDIA has nominated its best performing volunteers for internships at top law firms such as JSA, Trilegal, Luthra and Luthra, AZB etc. as well as companies like GE, Microsoft, Thomson Reuters, LexisNexis etc.
  2. An exceptional IDIA team leader/deputy team leader could be nominated for a series of awards including a fellowship instituted by a leading lawyer (IDIA: Sagar Fellowships) that pays a good sum each month.
  3. A certificate highlighting your contribution to IDIA and providing an assessment of your work.

Application Process:

Those interested in applying may fill in this form and prepare a set of 10 questions( as per the new pattern) on their preferred choice of subject. The deadline to fill in the form and submit the assignment is 11:59 P.M. Saturday, 27th February 2021. The assignments should be uploaded on the above-mentioned google form and kindly name the files you upload as ‘<Your Name>_<Preferred subject>’ (e.g., Piyush Tiwari_Legal Reasoning.docx). Please also email your assignment(s) to trainingandmaterials@idialaw.org before the deadline.

Nature of Assignment:

This assignment will essentially entail preparation of 10 questions on your preferred choice of subject. The questions must be based on CLAT’s new pattern and adherence to the same will be the primary criteria of evaluation.

For submitting your assignment, prepare a word document containing the set of questions, along with a separate word document having answers accompanied by brief explanations. Each question must have 4 options, as per CLAT’s format, and must follow a uniform numbering format. Refrain from plagiarising questions from other sources. While the passages/excerpts may be the same, the questions have to be original.

Evaluation will be based on:

  • Adherence to the new pattern
  • Accuracy of questions
  • Originality of the submissions.
  • Formatting – Please make sure the questions fall in a uniform numbered list. It is imperative that all questions (as well as their options) under one heading be connected in a single, automatic numbered list.
  • Quality of answer explanations.
  • Explanations for GK may be based on elaborating facts, or providing context to the answer.

Applicants having past experience with similar projects are encouraged to apply, although that is not a strict requirement for selection. Members of regional teams are also encouraged to apply.

Note to the applicants: As the CLAT pattern has been changed this year and is heavily analytical and comprehension based. Hence, we suggest everyone to go through the guide to UG CLAT-2020 available here, before starting with the assignments. This will enable you to understand the pattern clearly. The word limit for questions is also given in the above-mentioned guide, conformity with the same is expected and will also be taken into account for evaluation. For illustration purposes, sample questions are available here and here.

Deadline:

All submissions must be completed by 11:59 PM, Saturday, 27th February 2021. Delays will not be condoned, failure to submit a task will lead to the rejection of your application.

Needless to say, each of these projects would require you to maintain a high level of professionalism and meet strict deadlines. In case of any doubt(s), please feel free to write to Piyush Tiwari (trainingandmaterials@idialaw.org), we would be happy to answer your queries or take up suggestions.

IDIA

A glimpse of Anand Kumar’s Journey

Background

Anand Kumar hails from ‘Masaurhi’, a small town that is 30 kms away from Patna. He is a highly motivated and hardworking student. His father is a retired army personnel and their total monthly family income is around Rs. 19,000. He has two elder sisters, both of whom are preparing for competitive examinations, and his mother is a homemaker. Anand completed his tenth standard from the St. Mary’s School, Masaurhi (Patna), scoring a CGPA of 8 out of 10.

Since his father sought an early retirement from the army, Anand had to complete his twelfth standard from a Government school – Ram Naresh Senyai School, Kurtha where he scored 65% in his examinations. In his free time, he likes to play sports, especially cricket.

When did Anand decide that he wanted to attempt CLAT?

After his 12th standard, Anand initially started to prepare for NEET Examination due to family pressure, but after one failed attempt, he took some time off to figure out what actually suits him and that is when he came across law as a profession and decided to attempt CLAT.

Anand Kumar came to know about IDIA through one of his seniors in school who is currently studying in CNLU, Patna. He qualified among many students who gave the IDIA National Aptitude Test, and was selected as an IDIA Trainee.

According to him, law is the best subject he can study. He believes that law is an important aspect of everyone’s life and it plays an integral role in a nation’s growth and development. He is determined to study law and contribute towards the development of his community.

Anand has secured an impressive AIR 5 in CLAT 2020 with an outstanding score of 117 out of 150 and has been allotted NLSIU in the first CLAT list. The total cost of studying at NLSIU, Bangalore, inclusive of tuition, hostel and mess expenses, internship, and nominal living expenses is INR 5 lakhs for the first year. Please come forward and help Anand achieve his dream of becoming a lawyer!

For a detailed break up of Anand’s expenses, write to us at prateek@idialaw.org


About IDIA:

IDIA is a pan-India movement to train underprivileged students and help transform them into leading lawyers and community advocates. IDIA is premised on the notion that access to premier legal education empowers marginalized communities and helps them help themselves. IDIA selects and trains students from underprivileged backgrounds (IDIA Trainees) to crack top law entrance examinations in India. Once they are admitted to top law colleges, it provides a scholarship to these students (IDIA Scholars) that comprises financial support, training and mentorship among other things.

Read more about IDIA here: https://www.idialaw.org/

Get in touch with them here: info@idialaw.org


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Case BriefsHigh Courts

Orissa High Court: A Division Bench of S. Panda and S. K. Panigrahi JJ., dismissed the petition and called upon the relevant legal stakeholders to ensure that a uniform and well-defined parameter is adopted so that the meritorious candidates do not suffer.

The facts of the case are such that the petitioner has challenged the inaction of opposite party 1 in not considering the application of the petitioner for admission into 5 years BBA LLB (Hons.) Course under NRIs (Non-Resident Indian Sponsored) category for the academic year commencing 2020.

Counsel for the petitioners submitted that when she applied for CLAT (Common Law Admission Test) examination and wanted to apply through NRI quota but selected GENERAL CATEGORY for the same, however, due to COVID outbreak she wasn’t able to modify the quota due to technical glitch on the last date i.e. 15-08-2020. It was further submitted that the petitioner’s name was not found in the merit list where the candidates with a lower rank than that of the petitioner were in the merit list as against NRI/NRIs category.

Counsel for the respondents submitted the petitioner herein has not applied under NRI/NRIs category for the CLAT 2020 Application in spite of several extensions granted to the students by the CLAT Consortium. It was further submitted that there is always the possibility of server down, internet glitch etc. and therefore, it has been advised by the CLAT conducting authority that candidates must apply well before the last date because there tends to be a heavy rush on the use of internet on the last date.

The Court observed that The Opposite Party 1 is bound by the CLAT Rules and Notification. If the petitioner fails to figure in the CLAT 2020 NRI/NRIs category, the Opposite Party 1 cannot change the category of the candidate. Since the petitioner has not applied under NRI/NRIs category in the CLAT 2020 Application, due to the said fact the OP 1 had to reject the candidate’s application.

Court held that changing the category, at this juncture when the admissions are over, would disturb the entire process and jeopardize the interest of so many students.

The Court before disposing off the petition relied on the judgment P. A. Inamdar v. State of Maharashtra, (2005) 6 SCC 537 and observed:

“NRIs category is an affront to the meritorious candidates who toiled day night to secure seats in NLUs through CLAT. The candidates belonging to the category of NRI/NRIs, who are very low ranked in the merit list often gets seat in the NLUs whereas the general candidates having secured better marks also lag behind the NRIS students and get disappointed. This is like the reservation for the elite class and this dubious category of quota is unconstitutional.”[Ishika Pattnaik v. National Law University of Odisha,  2020 SCC OnLine Ori 762, decided on 20-10-2020]


Arunima Bose, Editorial Assistant has put this story together

IDIA

Yamuna Menon and her story to reaching an unprecedented level

Yamuna graduated from the National Law School of India University, Bangalore in September 2020. She hails from the Udayamperoor area in Ernakulam, Kerala.

Background

Yamuna found out about IDIA when she came across an article in the newspaper and got in touch with the IDIA Kerala Chapter. She then underwent coaching for law entrance examinations in Ernakulam from Heritage coaching centre. In 2014, she could not clear the Common Law Admission Test (CLAT) on her first attempt but she did not give up. She went on to secure the 28th rank in CLAT in 2015.

Yamuna is an all-rounder who is engaged in academics, arts and sports events. She has participated in debates, Model United Nations, and various other activities. She even had the opportunity to participate in moots in London and Singapore. She also represented India in a youth delegation program in Nepal and was also selected for a leadership programme in Australia. She has worked with various social institutions, including NGOs, which helped her in developing qualities to face the real world outside and learn from the challenges that she is presented with. She has been editor-in-chief of the Indian Journal of International Economic Law. Her article on the exploitative Sumangali Scheme in the Tamil Nadu textile industry for which she had one-to-one interaction with Sumangali girls in villages near Coimbatore has been published in the Cambridge Law Review.

Yamuna also had an opportunity to be a Judicial Intern at the Office of Justice Dr Justice D.Y. Chandrachud, Supreme Court of India. Her other notable internships include those at Shardul Amarchand Mangaldas & Co, Hindustan Unilever and Economic Laws Practice.

She is the topper of her batch, with 18 gold medals which is the highest number of medals received by any student in the history of the University.

Yamuna is set to proceed to her new chapter in life – she will be leaving to pursue her Masters in Law from Trinity College at Cambridge University, the United Kingdom on a scholarship. In fact, she was even offered a seat at the University of Oxford but chose Cambridge University for personal reasons!


About IDIA:

IDIA is a pan-India movement to train underprivileged students and help transform them into leading lawyers and community advocates. IDIA is premised on the notion that access to premier legal education empowers marginalized communities and helps them help themselves. IDIA selects and trains students from underprivileged backgrounds (IDIA Trainees) to crack top law entrance examinations in India. Once they are admitted to top law colleges, it provides a scholarship to these students (IDIA Scholars) that comprises financial support, training and mentorship among other things.

Read more about IDIA here: https://www.idialaw.org/

Get in touch with them here: info@idialaw.org


SCC Online is now on Telegram and Instagram. Join our channel @scconline on Telegram and @scconline_ on Instagram and stay updated with the latest legal news from within and outside India

Hot Off The PressLaw School NewsNewsOthers

In a press release issued by NLSIU post the Supreme Court declaring NLAT 2020 to be null and void, the University has affirmed that it will implement the judgment and orders of the Court in letter and spirit. The University reaffirmed that:

  • It will admit students on the basis of CLAT 2020 and not NLAT 2020 for the Academic Year 2020-21.
  • It has begun working with vendors to initiate refunds to all NLAT aspirants. Students may expect refunds after a deduction of Rs 75 as application processing charges in the next 9-14 days.

The faculty of NLSIU in a meeting resolved to do everything possible to respect the founding commitment to a trimester based academic calendar and maintain the highest rigour and standards that NLSIU is known for.The University thanked all students and parents for their patience and support throughout September. The press release issued by NLSIU can be read here.

Read the full Press Release here

Read the detailed report on the Supreme Court judgment quashing NLAT here

Case BriefsCOVID 19Supreme Court

Supreme Court: The Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR Shah, JJ has quashed the NLAT entrance exam conducted by NLSIU, Bengaluru on September 12, 2020 and has directed the admission of students in all National Law Universities through CLAT -2020.

BACKGROUND

In the notification dated 03.09.2020, NLSIU had stated that the decision was taken due to the unforeseen difficulties and delays in the conduct of CLAT 2020. As NLSIU follows a trimester system it was uniquely disadvantaged as every academic year is made up of three terms of 90 days duration. Moreover, each term must accommodate 60 hours of classroom instruction in each course and adequately provide for examination and evaluation processes. If it were unable to complete admissions by the end of September 2020 it would inevitably result in a ‘Zero Year’ with no admission. Read more

The bench had, on 11.09.2020, refused to stay the conduct of NLAT by NLSIU Bengaluru which is scheduled to be held a day later but had directed that “neither the result shall be declared nor any admission be made consequent thereto.” Read more

Allegedly, in examination held on 12.09.2020 and 14.09.2020 any malpractices were adopted. On the allegation that the paper was leaked on 14.09.2020, NLSIU had issued a statement claiming that allegation is of downloading of the papers in the last 15 minutes of the examination on 14.09.2020, which has not in any way affected integrity of examination.

WHETHER IT WAS NECESSARY TO OBTAIN ACADEMIC COUNCIL’s RECOMMENDATION BEFORE ISSUING NOTIFICATION DATED 03.09.2020?

There can be no dispute that Executive Council is the Chief Executive Body of NLSIU and the administration, management and control of NLSIU is vested in the Executive Council and in the administration, right to admit the students is included but when the Act, 1986 empower the Academic Council to take decision regarding admission of the students in LL.B. Course and with regard to mode and manner of conducting the admission test, it was obligatory for the Vice-Chancellor to have obtained the recommendations of the Academic Council.

When the Academic Council has been given power of control, general regulations and is responsible for maintenance of standards of instruction, education and examination of the school, its one of the functions, undoubtedly is to regulate the admission of students.

“The Vice-Chancellor himself is the Chairman of the Academic Council and there was no difficulty and with regard to meetings of the Academic Council Clause 15 sub-clause (6) provides that if urgent action by the Academic Council becomes necessary, the Chairman of the Academic Council is empowered to permit the business to be transacted by circulation of papers to the members of the Academic Council.”

The Court, hence, held that the recommendation of Academic Council was necessary to be obtained for holding a separate entry test namely NLAT especially when NLSIU was proposing to hold the above test instead of admitting the students by CLAT from which common law admission test, admission in LL.B. course was being done for last more than a decade. When NLSIU wanted to conduct NLAT as online home proctored test of 45 minutes containing 40 questions which mode and manner was different from earlier prescriptions, the recommendations of Academic Council were must.

Hence, the admission notification dated 03.09.2020 having been issued without recommendation of Academic Council is not in accordance with the provisions of Act, 1986 and is unsustainable.

WHETHER NLSIU BEING FOUNDER MEMBER OF CONSORTIUM OF NATIONAL LAW UNIVERSITIES, IS BOUND BY ITS BYE-LAWS AND WAS OBLIGED TO ADMIT THE STUDENTS FOR INTEGRATED B.A.LL.B. (HONS.) PROGRAMME THROUGH CLAT 2020?

National Law School of India University, Bangaluru from the beginning shouldered the leading role in conduct of CLAT. Different National Law Universities have been established by different statues and have statutory functions and obligations to achieve a common purpose and to give a boost to legal education in the country. They have themselves imposed obligations on them to be a part of the Consortium for a common cause. CLAT being an All India Examination for different National Law Universities has achieved its own importance and prominence in legal education. The steps taken by National Law Universities to form a Consortium and to cooperate with each other in conduct of CLAT is towards discharge of their public duty entrusted under the different statutes. The duty to uphold its integrity lies on the shoulder of each and every member.

Thousands of the students who aspire to have a career in law look forward to the CLAT as a prestigious test and CLAT has proved its usefulness and utility in this country. Students look forward to the Consortium for providing correct and fair assessment of the merits of the students. The bye-laws under which members are required to admit the students in their law universities on the basis of the CLAT for UG and PG law courses are binding on the members.

Even though obligations on members of Consortium under the Bye-Laws are not statutory obligations but those obligations are binding on the members. All members occupying significant and important status have to conduct in fair and reasonable manner to fulfill the aspirations of thousands of students who look on these National Law Universities as institutions of higher learning, personality and career builders.

“… the statutes under which National Law Universities have been established cast public duties on these NLUs to function in a fair, reasonable and transparent manner. These institutions of higher learning are looked by society and students with respect and great Trust. All NLUs have to conduct themselves in a manner which fulfills the cause of education and maintain the trust reposed on them.”

WHETHER “DOCTRINE OF NECESSITY” WAS APPLICABLE IN THE FACT SITUATION OF THE ONGOING PANDEMIC?

NLSIU follows a unique system of Trimester, each semester has 70 teaching days per three months term. The first Trimester as per resolution of academic council was to begin on 01.07.2020 and was to end till 30th September,2020. This period of three months is not available for NLSIU to start the first semester.

The Court, however, noticed that

“The entire country is struggling with Pandemic Covid-19 from March 2020. Loss in the academic year is for all Universities in the Country. The Academic Calendar of each University stood disrupted by Covid-19. None of the Universities have declared the year as a ‘zero year’.”

Not convinced with the submission that “Doctrine of Necessity” was applicable in the fact situation of the ongoing pandemic, the bench noticed that as provided by UGC guidelines dated 06.07.2020, the UGC expected the Universities to carry on some amendments in their academic calendar for the session 2020-21.

“The Universities are not powerless to modify their Academic Calendar looking to the pandemic. The Academic year 2020-21 is not a normal academic year in which Universities are expected to carry on their teaching and other activities in normal mode and manner.”

Hence, NLSIU could have very well found out ways and means to start the academic Under-Graduate Law course even if it starts in mid of October 2020 after conduct of the CLAT on 28.09.2020.

WHETHER ONLINE HOME PROCTORED EXAMINATION LACKS TRANSPARENCY AND IS VIOLATIVE OF THE RIGHTS OF THE STUDENTS UNDER ARTICLE 14 OF THE CONSTITUTION?

The Court took note of the fact that about 69,000 students have registered for CLAT-2020. 60 percent of 69,000 comes to 41,400. The registration into NLAT being only 24,603 out of which only 23,225 could appear makes it clear that a large number of students who could have wanted to apply for admission in NLSIU could not even apply due to shortage of time and technical requirement insisted by respondent No.1 University.

“The above figures fully support the submissions of the petitioner that a large section of the students especially belonging to marginalised sections of the society were denied the opportunity to appear in the examination.”

The Court, hence, held that the home based online examination as proposed by NLSIU for NLAT 2020-21 could not be held to be a test which was able to maintain transparency and integrity of the examination. The short notice and technological requirements insisted by the University deprived a large number of students to participate in the test violating their rights under Article 14 of the Constitution of India.

WHETHER NLAT HELD ON 12.09.2020 WITH RE-TEST ON 14.09.2020 WAS MARRED BY MALPRACTICES AND DESERVES TO BE SET ASIDE?

Refusing to go into this question, the Court said that it is not necessary for this court to enter into various materials referred to by the petitioners and the reports and to decide as to whether malpractices were actually adopted in the examination or not. NLSIU being premier University, we have no doubt that it must have taken all necessary precautions to avoid any malpractices and cheating in the examination.

The Court also noticed that the University has also filed a complaint of Cyber Crime which may be inquired in accordance with law. It, hence, said

“We need not express any opinion in this proceeding under Article 32 with regard to the aspect of malpractices in the test conducted on 12.09.2020 and 14.09.2020 which is essentially a matter of scrutiny of facts and evidence.”

DIRECTIONS

  1. The notice for admission to the five year integrated B.A.LL.B(Hons.) programme 2020-21 dated 03.09.2020 Annexure -P 14 as well as Press Release 106 on NLSIU admission 2020-21 dated 04.09.2020 Annexure-P 15 are quashed.
  2. CLAT-2020 examination to be conducted on 28.09.2020 taking all precautions and care for health of the students after following the Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) of the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare (MoHFW) and Ministry of Human Resource Development(MHRD).
  3. Entire process of declaration of the result to be completed as early as possible to enable the NLSIU and other National Law Universities to start their course by the mid of October-2020.
  4. NLSIU shall also complete the admission of B.A.LL.B(Hons.) programme 2020-21 on the basis of the result of CLAT-2020.

[Rakesh Kumar Agarwalla v. National Law School of India University, Bengaluru, 2020 SCC OnLine SC 761, decided on 21.09.2020]

IDIA

Bask into the Glory of this IDIA Scholar — Sheetal Kumari

Early Years

My name is Sheetal Kumari. I come from a tribal community and belong to a lower-middle-class family. I live in a small village in Kanke, Ranchi. I live with my mother and father and have 2 sisters. I passed my tenth exam from Cambrian Public School and my twelfth from Ursuline Intermediate College, Ranchi.

Background

I come from a community that is socially and economically backward. There is lack of awareness amongst the community members about the basic rights and duties of the citizens. This is the reason I wanted to pursue legal education so that I can work towards ensuring that all members can exercise their legal rights better by spreading awareness. There are very few girl children in my community who are getting a higher education and they are usually married at a very early age. I witnessed this kind of situation in my own village where girls are married at a very young age.

Legal Education

Thus, I want to get a legal education to fight for their rights. I know that our government provides many facilities for the betterment of our community but very few people get these benefits as they are not aware and also not very educated. So I want to spread awareness and make the people aware of their rights.

Preparation for CLAT

My father, Rajan Ram is a security guard in NUSRL, Ranchi and through the students of this college my father got to know about IDIA and he told me about this. Later I used to come to NUSRL as a trainee and many of the students helped me in preparing for CLAT. They used to give me the study material of CLAT free of cost through which I have gained a lot of knowledge about this exam. When exams were coming soon they also sent me to CLAT coaching without any fees which help me a lot in cracking CLAT.

Initially, I was very nervous on giving law entrance exam but because of the hard work of my teachers and IDIA trainees, they gave me the confidence to crack this. They taught me how to manage time and accuracy in the exam and by following their guidance, I cracked the exam and when I received the results of the exam I was very happy and satisfied. My parents were also happy with my results. All my relatives came to congratulate me and gave their blessings for my bright and better future. But I was worried about studying in a national law university where students come from high-class backgrounds. Through IDIA I got admission to NUSRL.

College Life

When I got admitted to the University I felt very lucky to get this opportunity to study in this college. The college campus is very good and the food is also very tasty. I have made 4-5 friends and they are very helpful in nature. My classmates are also very helpful. Faculty members are also very helpful and cooperative in nature. They help us in developing our overall personality. I am very enthusiastic about the coming five years and I want to get the best education and lots of good experience and opportunities in the coming years. This college has given me excellent facilities and an environment to study – exactly what I need to succeed in life.


About IDIA:

IDIA is a pan-India movement to train underprivileged students and help transform them into leading lawyers and community advocates. IDIA is premised on the notion that access to premier legal education empowers marginalized communities and helps them help themselves. IDIA selects and trains students from underprivileged backgrounds (IDIA Trainees) to crack top law entrance examinations in India. Once they are admitted to top law colleges, it provides a scholarship to these students (IDIA Scholars) that comprises financial support, training and mentorship among other things.

Read more about IDIA here: https://www.idialaw.org/

Get in touch with them here: info@idialaw.org


SCC Online is now on Telegram and Instagram. Join our channel @scconline on Telegram and @scconline_ on Instagram and stay updated with the latest legal news from within and outside India

Case BriefsSupreme Court

Supreme Court: The bench of Ashok Bhushan, R. Subhash Reddy and MR Shah, JJ has refused to stay the conduct of NLAT by NLSIU Bengaluru which is scheduled to be held today but has directed that “neither the result shall be declared nor any admission be made consequent thereto.”

The conduct of NLAT for admission to the Five-Years Integrated B.A., LL.B (Hons.) Programme, 2020-21 has been challenged on the ground that Common Law Admission Test (CLAT) has already been notified and has been postponed to 28th September, 2020. Senior Advocate Nidhesh Gupta, appearing for the petitioner, submitted that since NLSIU is also part of it, no separate admission test by National Law School of India University, Bengaluru could have been held which has been notified to be held.

Senior Advocate Arvind P. Datar, appearing on behalf of NLSIU submitted that examination is scheduled for 12.09.2020 and all preparations have been made for conducting the admission test.

Looking to the importance of the issues raised in this petition, the Court permitted the respondents to file their reply to the writ petition. Listing the matter for further hearing on 16.09.2020, the Court directed.

“examination for admission in pursuance of Notification dated 04.09.2020 may take place but neither the result shall be declared nor any admission be made consequent thereto. We make it clear that conducting of examination shall be subject to the outcome of the writ petition.”

In the notification dated 04.09.2020, NLSIU had stated that the decision was taken due to the unforeseen difficulties and delays in the conduct of CLAT 2020. As NLSIU follows a trimester system it was uniquely disadvantaged as every academic year is made up of three terms of 90 days duration. Moreover, each term must accommodate 60 hours of classroom instruction in each course and adequately provide for examination and evaluation processes. If it were unable to complete admissions by the end of September 2020 it would inevitably result in a ‘Zero Year’ with no admission. Read more

[Rakesh Kumar Agarwalla v. National Law School of India University, Bengaluru, 2020 SCC OnLine SC 734, order dated 11.09.2020]

Case BriefsSupreme Court

Supreme Court: The 3-judge bench of L. Nageswara Rao, Hemant Gupta and S. Ravindra Bhat, JJ has held that the decision of West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, Kolkata (NUJS, Kolkata) to provide 30% reservation from the next Academic Year cannot be said to be contradictory to the amendment to the National University of Juridical Sciences Act, 1999 when the reservation policy of 30% seats was not available on the date when the admission process was initiated.

The Court was hearing the case of a student who had sought admission to the five-year law course offered by NUJS, Kolkata on the basis of the amendment in the West Bengal for short, ‘University’ National University of Juridical Sciences Act, 1999 vide the Amending Act which came into force on 21st May, 2019. The Amending Act inter alia provided for reservation of seats for students domiciled in the State of West Bengal to the extent of at least thirty percent of the total intake of the University.

An advertisement was published on 5th January 2019 by a consortium of National Law Universities in the country to conduct Common Law Admission Test on 12th May 2019 for which the last date of submission of application forms was 31st March 2019. The under-graduate admissions process herein provided for a choice of institution to the candidate, in which such candidate was willing to seek admission based on merit. The date of CLAT was later changed to 26th May 2019 in which the appellant participated and was ranked 731 in the All India Merit List, declared on 14th June 2019. As per the merit list and his choice, he was selected to get admission in National Law University, Odisha but admittedly, he did not join such institution. The University had issued a Brochure to fill up 127 seats based on CLAT merit list. As per the Brochure, 74 seats were meant for general category candidates and 10 seats for West Bengal domiciled candidates including 4 seats for general category.

“The grievance of the appellant was that 30% of the seats were reserved for the students domiciled in the State of West Bengal when the Act was amended on 21st May 2019. The Act had come into force before CLAT was conducted, but the benefit of reservation had not been extended to the students by the University in the Academic Session 2019-2020.”

The Court noticed that the total seats at the University are 127 including the seats meant for State domicile candidates prior to the amendment. The additional seats reserved were required to be provided at the time of initiation of the admission process which started in January, 2019. Each of the candidates intending to appear in the CLAT is required to give three choices for admission into the National Law Universities. The candidates had given these choices keeping in view the reservation policy of each State.

The Court said that since the reservation policy of 30% seats was not available on the date when the admission process was initiated, the decision of the University to provide reservation from the next Academic Year cannot be said to be contradictory to the provisions of the Amending Act. The Act is silent in respect of Academic Year in which the benefit of reservation is to be given.

“The candidates have already applied and given an option for admission in the various National Law Universities before the coming into force of the Amending Act. Therefore, the University extended the benefit of the reservation from the next Academic Session. We find such decision to be fair, reasonable and not arbitrary or capricious.”

[Shrayas Sinha v. West Bengal National University of Juridical Sciences, CIVIL APPEAL NO. 3085 OF 2020, decided on 10.09.2020]

Law School NewsOthers

Timings for NLAT Undergraduate Exam Announced

The NLSIU authorities have announced that the NLAT will be conducted in three batches on September 12. Candidates will be informed about their batch 24 hours in advance of the exam. The timings of the three batches are given below:

Batch 1:

Reporting time: 12:00 pm

Exam Start time: 12:30 pm

Batch 2:

Reporting time: 1.45 pm

Exam Start time: 2.15 pm

Batch 3:

Reporting time: 3:30 pm

Exam Start time: 4:00 pm

15 minutes extra will be given to PWD Candidates as per notification released earlier

Simulation Test Details Notified

NLSIU has informed that candidates may receive a different batch time for the Simulation Test which is to be held on September 11th than for the actual NLAT examination. This is a measure to prevent malpractice. Candidates are requested to check the batch timings for the Simulation Test and for the actual NLAT examination carefully.[1]

List of Test Centres Increased

List of test centres has increased from 14 to 35, this has been notified in the FAQ section of the NLS website under the heading ‘test centres’[2]


[1] https://twitter.com/NLSIUofficial/status/1304084034625044480 

[2] https://www.nls.ac.in/admissions/nlat-2020-faqs/


Also read

NLAT to be conducted in three sessions

Facing backlash on social media, NLSIU is devising ways to make NLAT 2020 more accessible for candidates

NLSIU all set to conduct separate entrance test for the academic year 2020-21, CLAT scores not to be considered 

Technical requirements for NLSIU’s NLAT exam to be held on 12th September

NLAT| Latest Press Releases by NLSIU, including instructions for PWD candidates [Key Highlights]

Hot Off The PressLaw School NewsNewsOthers

The NLAT will be conducted in three sessions. This was updated in the  FAQ section of the official website .

The new insertion states that:

“UG NLAT 2020 will be conducted in three sessions in line with other large examinations. It is possible that in spite of all efforts to maintain equivalence among various question papers, the difficulty level of the question papers administered in different sessions may not exactly be the same.”

To resolve this issue, NLAT has come up with the following solution

“To overcome this, a Normalization procedure will be used to compile law scores across batches and ensure a level playing field where candidates are neither benefited nor disadvantaged due to the difficulty level of the exam.”

NLAT is yet to notify the timings of the UG exam.

NLAT has notified the protocol for monitoring the exam, NLAT is a home based test except for students who opt to take it at a centre. The notification states the following

  1. The proctor will verify the identity of candidates by checking government IDs. In case of PWD candidates both candidate’s and scribe’s identity will be verified. In case of impersonation, the proctor will not allow the impersonator to start the exam.
  2. In case the candidate is in inappropriate surroundings or seems to be getting external help  Proctors will send this type of messages to such candidates:

a. “Please sweep the camera in a circle around the place you are taking the assessment” and / or: “Please tilt the device/ keyboard you are using for the assessment”.

b. Candidates to show a 360-degree view of the entire room by turning on a webcam (laptops/desktops) or front/ selfie camera (as directed by proctor) (mobile devices)/ tilt the device/ keyboard, as instructed.

If any unauthorized person is found then proctor can terminate the exam immediately. Candidates will get 45 seconds to reply to proctor’s instructions, failing which the exam will be terminated. Additional 10 seconds can be granted at proctor’s discretion.

  1. Candidates will be logged out of exam after 5 attempts of trying to switch window ie. trying to access any other window except the test window.
  2. If the candidate’s face cannot be detected, then a warning will be sent and if the candidate does not reappear within 45 seconds then his exam will be terminated. If the candidate is talking or making gestures, then also warning will be given and exam terminated if the student does not comply.
  3. If any other person or device is detected in vicinity then a warning will be sent and if the person does not leave immediately or that device is removed  then the exam will be terminated.
  4. If the candidate is seen wearing headphones, earphones or bluetooth devices then a warning will be sent and the exam terminated if the candidate does not comply. These devices can be plugged in for microphone purposes but the candidate should not be wearing them
  5. If there are simultaneous login attempts from various devices

a. Proctor will observe picture of candidates from all devices

b. If observed that someone other than the candidate is logging in then the exam will be terminated immediately.

c. If the same person is observed in all devices, the proctor will notify the super proctor who will seek clarification and disqualify upon his discretion.

In case of situations such as internet failure/ power failure, the assessment system may permit the candidate to continue answering the question paper in events of internet failure; however, this is subject to the Proctor’s discretion, and subject to the candidate’s system re-connecting to the examination interface within the time and in the manner stipulated in the on-screen instructions and the Candidate Manual which will be provided to candidates in advance of the exam

The entire notification can be read here.


Also read

Facing backlash on social media, NLSIU is devising ways to make NLAT 2020 more accessible for candidates

NLSIU all set to conduct separate entrance test for the academic year 2020-21, CLAT scores not to be considered 

Technical requirements for NLSIU’s NLAT exam to be held on 12th September

NLAT| Latest Press Releases by NLSIU, including instructions for PWD candidates [Key Highlights]

Hot Off The PressLaw School NewsNewsOthers

There have been many press releases by NLAT authorities over the past few days. For your convenience we have summarized the main points below:

Press Release Dated 4th September

● Preparations for CLAT 2020 started in November 2019. Consortium being based out of NLSIU, CLAT Secretariat and NLSIU played a key role in conceptualizing the new exam pattern. The team played a key role in developing sample questions and study modules. NLSIU provided extensive technological, logistical and administrative support and will continue to do so for smooth functioning of CLAT.
● CLAT was repeatedly postponed five times because of the COVID pandemic. The last date finalised for CLAT was 28th September which was too late for NLSIU as it follows a trimester system. If they could not finalise the admissions by the end of September it would result in a Zero year.
● To avoid a zero year, NLSIU came up with NLAT, a home based computer test, capped at a nominal fee of Rs 150/-, and testing on the same subjects as CLAT. To ensure integrity of NLAT, a combination of technological, artificial intelligence proctoring and human proctoring would be put in use. NLSIU is committed to holding a fair, accessible and safe admission process.

Read the full Press Release here

Press Release Dated 6th September

● NLSIU had on several occasions provided options for conduct of CLAT 2020 to the Consortium. The options were (1) Carving out exceptions to NLUs to conduct their own entrance test (2) allowing CLAT to be conducted in 2 or more series (3) Allowing for individual NLUs to conduct an examination, permitting CLAT-enrolled candidates to appear for a separate examination without any registration. Consortium rejected these options. The decision to postpone CLAT from 7th to 28th September, was not taken unanimously, therefore NLSIU had no option but to introduce NLAT to avoid a Zero Year.
● On 4th September, the consortium requested NLSIU to reconsider its decision stating that is violative of Clause 15.3.3 of the Consortium Bye-Laws and if NLSIU were to stick to its decision, it would be removed from the Consortium. NLSIU responded stating that under MOA and bye-laws the General Body had no legal authority to remove NLSIU from the Consortium. On 5th September, the Consortium held a meeting that the Vice Chancellor of NLSIU was in derogation of the Bye-Laws and the Objectives of the Consortium. This press release has not yet been formally received by NLSIU.
● The faculty and executive committee of NLSIU unanimously resolved and authorized the University, and the Vice Chancellor to conduct the NLAT due to the repeated postponement of CLAT. NLSIU affirms that the University, and its Vice Chancellor, have not violated the Consortium Bye-Laws. They have not acted in any manner that gives rise to any potential for a conflict of interest and therefore claims made by the Consortium in its Press Release dated 6th September have no legal basis. However, given the statements of the Consortium in its Press Release, NLSIU, and its Vice Chancellor, have no alternative but to completely disassociate from CLAT 2020.
● NLSIU confirms that it is fully committed to delivering NLAT 2020 on time and in a student friendly manner.

Read the full Press Release here

Instructions for persons with disabilities appearing for NLAT

NLSIU has released certain instructions for people with disabilities who wish to appear for the NLAT exam.

● PWD candidates with visual impairment, cerebral palsy and locomotor disability (Both Arms affected) are entitled to avail services of a scribe.
● PWD candidates with other types of benchmark disabilities are also eligible for a scribe provided they submit requisite medical certificates as instructed under Appendix 1
● Candidates will have to choose their own scribe who should be at least Class 10th pass and his maximum educational qualification should not exceed the candidate’s own qualifications. Candidates should submit a Letter of Intent as instructed under Appendix 2.
● All candidates must fill in the necessary fields in the ‘Reservations Tab’ of their Application Form and upload it into Admissions Portal.
● All PWD candidates with benchmark disabilities shall be provided additional time of 15 minutes to complete the NLAT. This includes PWD candidates who avail the services of a scribe.


Also read

NLSIU all set to conduct separate entrance test for the academic year 2020-21, CLAT scores not to be considered 

Technical requirements for NLSIU’s NLAT exam to be held on 12th September

Hot Off The PressLaw School NewsNewsOthers

The Consortium of National Law Universities met on September 5th under the chairmanship of President V. Vijayakumar, Hon’ble Vice-Chancellor of NLIU, Bhopal and took the following decisions:

  1. The seat of the CLAT Consortium has been shifted from NLSIU, Bangalore to NALSAR, Hyderabad in wake of NLSIU’s decision to conduct its own entrance this year.
  2. CLAT exam to be held on 28th September, 2020. Except NLSIU, Bangalore, no other Law University  to hold its test independently as was erroneously reported in the media.
  3. NLSIU Vice-Chancellor Prof Sudhir Krishnaswami has been divested of the post of Secretary-Treasurer  of the Consortium , in the light of the clear conflict of interest between the functions of the Consortium and his decision to hold an independent test for NLSIU. In his place Professor K. D. Rao, last year’s CLAT convener and Hon’ble Vice-Chancellor, NLU, Odisha, shall discharge the financial functions of the Treasurer of the CLAT Consortium.
  4.  Professor Faizan Mustafa, the Senior-most member of the Consortium and Past President shall  discharge all the administrative and secretarial functions of the Consortium. He shall also take over the control of the official website.
  5. The consortium unanimously resolved that Professor Sudhir Krishnaswami’s decision to go ahead with a unilateral test was in derogation of the Bye-laws and the Objectives of the Consortium.

Read the Press Release here


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NLSIU all set to conduct separate entrance test for the academic year 2020-21, CLAT scores not to be considered 

Technical requirements for NLSIU’s NLAT exam to be held on 12th September

IDIA

Here’s the story of Biswajit Shil, an IDIA Scholar:

Background

My name is Biswajit Shil and I am studying at the WB National University of Juridical Sciences. I did my schooling from Ramakrishna Mission Blind Boys Academy. I belong to the South Dinajpur district of West Bengal. I belong to a middle-class Bengali family.

My father is a farmer and a small businessman and my mother is a housewife. We are three brothers and one sister. Two of us are visually challenged. From my childhood, I am fighting against my physical disability and because of this, I had to face various kinds of problems in my life. Due to my disability, I also felt sad at times. From the beginning of my educational life, I was in a boarding school. After leaving home, I learned, socializing, how to overcome my disability, how to adjust with the other people and how to present myself in front of the society.

I can recall that I was neglected by some people before starting my education but they also appreciate me at present. Now I feel proud of myself because I am more eligible than many people of the society in spite of being physically disabled.

Preparation for CLAT

I am fond of listening to and playing music. I learned to play the violin in my school. I am fond of reading stories and novels as well. The role of IDIA in my life is incomparable and it is like a blessing of God on me. A sensitization programme was conducted by IDIA in our school. I was impressed by law as a meaningful career option and therefore I attended INAT for becoming an IDIA trainee. I did not do well in the first attempt and I was disappointed. I appeared again the second time and I got selected as an IDIA trainee. For preparing for CLAT, IDIA provided me training through admission to a coaching center. The IDIA members of NUJS also guided me with great care. Then I appeared for CLAT and got admission to the WB National University of Juridical Sciences.

Law School & the Hurdles

After coming to law school, I faced many kinds of problems. For instance, I come from a Bengali medium school and as such, the English language is a big issue for me. I do not know English well. For being a good lawyer, writing skills must be good, but I feel that my writing skills are very poor. I am determined to improve the same. My communication skills are not so good, as a result, I feel difficult to participate in the class properly. I cannot complete my everyday lessons in time. I face difficulties in doing my projects work as well. Apart from this, I cannot access the online database independently because I have low knowledge of computers. So, I am unable to do research work properly. As I cannot use hard copy material, I have to take the help of technology. Therefore, I feel I must take computer training.

IDIA Volunteers

After the classes, if I feel any difficulties, IDIA volunteers are eager to help me as much as they can. After coming to law school my confidence level has increased a lot. I hope that I can improve myself and I will be able to reach my goals in life of becoming a good lawyer and most importantly, a good human being.


About IDIA:

IDIA is a pan-India movement to train underprivileged students and help transform them into leading lawyers and community advocates. IDIA is premised on the notion that access to premier legal education empowers marginalized communities and helps them help themselves. IDIA selects and trains students from underprivileged backgrounds (IDIA Trainees) to crack top law entrance examinations in India. Once they are admitted to top law colleges, it provides a scholarship to these students (IDIA Scholars) that comprises financial support, training and mentorship among other things.

Read more about IDIA here: https://www.idialaw.org/

Get in touch with them here: info@idialaw.org


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Hot Off The PressNews

The General Body of the Consortium of National Law Universities has set a new date for the CLAT UG and PG exam, it will be held on 7th September, 2020. The exam will be held between 2pm and 4pm and will be an online, centre-based test.

Admit cards will be available for download from the official website in two weeks’ time. No candidate will be allowed to enter the centre without a mask. The consortium is in the process of securing permissions so that admit cards are treated as movement passes by local authorities. Further instructions shall be issued in due course by the consortium.

Read the Official Notification here

Hot Off The PressNews

Supreme Court: A bench headed by L Nageswara Rao, J has dismissed a petition seeking direction to conduct the Common Law Admission Test (CLAT) through offline mode in view of the increasing number of COVID-19 cases across the country.

Advocate Mitul Jain, in his petition, had contended that the CLAT committee had initially decided to hold the exam offline but now it is going ahead with the online test. The lawyer argued that the move will prevent students who do not have access to computers to sit for the admission test. The CLAT committee  should have come out with a foolproof solution and given a month’s time to the aspiring candidates.

The CLAT, a national level entrance exam for admissions to undergraduate and postgraduate law programmes offered by 22 National Law Universities around  the country, is organised by the Consortium of National Law Universities consisting of representative universities. As per CLAT, registrations for the examination closed on July 10, 2020, and the online exam will be conducted on August 22, 2020.


Source: ANI


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